Level 1 and Level 2 Assessment Tests

The Level 1 and Level 2 Assessment Tests

Students will be required to take and pass two (2) “Assessment Tests” during their academic career and prior to beginning Bar Essay in the next-to-last semester of law school.[1] The first test, the “Level 1 Assessment Test,” will be administered at the end of the final exam period for the semester when the student has completed all of the following courses: Civil Procedure, Torts, and  Contracts. For example, if a student begins law school in the fall semester, taking Civil Procedure, and then takes Torts and Contracts in the spring semester, the student will take the Level 1 Assessment Test at the end of the exam period for the spring semester, after having just completed the Contracts and Torts final exams. If, however, the student begins in the spring semester and takes Contracts and Torts that semester, the student will take the Level 1 Assessment test at the end of the fall semester, after having just completed the Civil Procedure final exam. The subjects tested on the Level 1 Assessment Test are Civil Procedure, Torts, and Contracts. A student cannot take the Level 2 Assessment Test until the student has passed the Level 1 Assessment Test.

The second test, the “Level 2 Assessment Test,” will be administered at the end of the final exam period for the semester when the student has completed all of the following courses: Criminal Law (not Criminal Procedure), Constitutional Law, and Evidence. For example, if a student takes all three courses in the fall semester, the student will take the Level 2 Assessment Test at the end of the exam period for that fall semester, after having just completed the Criminal Law, Constitutional Law, and Evidence final exams. If, however, the student does not take all three courses during the same semester, which is often the case, the student will take the Level 2 Assessment Test at the end of the exam period of the semester in which the student takes the one or two courses that completes the triad. The subjects tested on the Level 2 Assessment Test are Criminal Law (not Criminal Procedure), Evidence, and Constitutional Law. A student will not be allowed to begin Bar Essay, the penultimate required course, until the student has passed the Level 2 Assessment Test.

If a student does not pass either level of the Assessment Test, the student may retake it the next time it is offered. There will be two (2) makeup administrations following the spring semester, prior to the beginning of the fall semester. There will be two (2) makeup administrations following the fall semester, prior to the beginning of the spring semester.

Both the Level 1 and Level 2 Assessment Tests are required to be taken as close as possible to the completion of the three courses tested in each exam. A student who fails to take the applicable Assessment Test when s/he first becomes eligible, and misses both of the retake opportunities following it, will be deemed not to be in good academic standing, and therefore ineligible to continue with law school studies.

Each level of the Assessment Test will consist of sixty (60) multiple-choice questions similar to those given on the real bar exam. 

A passing score on both levels of the Assessment Test is 40% correct. Any student receiving 39% or less will have to retake the applicable test until the student receives a 40% or more. As said, a student may not take the Level 2 Assessment Test without having first passed Level 1 and a student may not take Bar Essay without first having passed Level 2.

Students who fail to pass either the Level 1 or Level 2 Assessment Test are required to initiate contact with, schedule an appointment with, and meet with their advisor within one week (7 days) of the test just failed (your score is provided instantly upon completion of the test). With their advisor’s input, students who do not pass will create a written plan outlining how they plan to achieve success on the next retake. Such students will continue to meet with their advisors on at least a weekly basis to discuss the plan and the student’s progress until the student obtains at least a score of 40% on the applicable test.   

[1] These Assessment Tests are not to be confused with the “Comparison Assessment Test” given at the beginning of the Comparison course in a student’s last semester.

Massachusetts School of Law's Mission

military logoMassachusetts School of Law's mission is to provide an academically rigorous affordable legal education emphasizing ethics, advocacy, leadership, and professional skills. MSLAW provides an accessible and affordable legal education to tomorrow’s leaders in law, business, and technology who seek to contribute to their communities as advocates, lawyers, and leaders. Lawyers have substantial influence in our society and MSLAW prepares its graduates to use that power to help their clients and obtain the societal advancement that a law degree has traditionally provided.

To accomplish its mission, Massachusetts School of Law brings together a diverse group of scholars, judges, expert practitioners and other professionals to provide individuals from all backgrounds a rigorous, professionally advantageous, affordable legal education so that they can improve their lives and better serve their communities.

The Massachusetts School of Law does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, disability, source of income, or status as a Vietnam-era or disabled veteran admission to, access to, treatment in, or employment in its programs and activities.
Email Us

Massachusetts School of Law's Mission

military logoMassachusetts School of Law's mission is to provide an academically rigorous affordable legal education emphasizing ethics, advocacy, leadership, and professional skills. MSLAW provides an accessible and affordable legal education to tomorrow’s leaders in law, business, and technology who seek to contribute to their communities as advocates, lawyers, and leaders. Lawyers have substantial influence in our society and MSLAW prepares its graduates to use that power to help their clients and obtain the societal advancement that a law degree has traditionally provided.

To accomplish its mission, Massachusetts School of Law brings together a diverse group of scholars, judges, expert practitioners and other professionals to provide individuals from all backgrounds a rigorous, professionally advantageous, affordable legal education so that they can improve their lives and better serve their communities.

The Massachusetts School of Law does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, disability, source of income, or status as a Vietnam-era or disabled veteran admission to, access to, treatment in, or employment in its programs and activities.