Required Courses

MSLAW has a sixteen week semester. So, for example, a student enrolled in a three-credit course will have three hours of class-time each week for sixteen weeks. MSLAW expects its students to spend at least three hours outside of class preparing for each class.

Required courses taken in the first year:

  • Business Entities & Operations
  • Civil Procedure and Conflict Resolution
  • Contracts
  • Criminal Law
  • Criminal Procedure
  • Torts
  • Writing & Legal Reasoning
  • Writing & Legal Research

Required courses taken after the first year include:

  • Bar Essay Writing and Analysis*
  • Comparison of Massachusetts and National Law**
  • Constitutional Law (must be taken during the second year)
  • Criminal Law (Part-Time Program)
  • Criminal Procedure (Part-Time Program)
  • Evidence (must be taken during the second year)
  • Legal Ethics/Professional Responsibility***
  • Motions and Litigation Practice
  • Property
  • UCC
  • Writing and Legal Advocacy

Although not required, it is recommended that the following courses also be taken:

  • Conveyancing
  • Family Law
  • Federal Taxation
  • Remedies
  • Wills and Trusts
*Beginning with the Spring 2019 semester, all students will be required to take Bar Essay regardless of their grade point average. Additionally, beginning with the Spring 2019 Semester, there will be no Pass/Fail grades in Bar Essay; every student will receive a letter grade. Students will need a grade of C or better in order to pass Bar Essay.  Students receiving anything less than a C will have to retake the course until they achieve a grade of C or better. Moreover, students who have not completed Bar Essay with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to register for Comparison. Students who have not successfully completed the eight (8) required courses tested on the MBE – Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Real Property, and Torts – PRIOR to beginning Bar Essay will not be allowed to register for, or take, Bar Essay. Again, please plan accordingly.

 

**Students who have not successfully completed all required courses (completing the course with a grade that is not an “F”) PRIOR to beginning Comparison will not be allowed to register for, or take, Comparison. Students who have not passed the MPRE and submitted a copy of their official pass notification to the Registrar’s Office prior to registration for Comparison, will not be allowed to register for, or take, Comparison. Students will not be allowed to register for Comparison if they have not successfully completed Bar Essay with a grade of C or better.

 

***Students will not receive a final grade in Legal Ethics until they pass the MPRE and give a copy of the official pass notification to the Registrar’s Office. Until such time, the grade of “I” (incomplete) will show on student transcripts (unless the Legal Ethics professor gives a student an “F” in the course irrespective of not having passed the MPRE, in which event the grade will be put on the transcript immediately). If an “I” is assigned, it will be changed to the grade the Legal Ethics professor gave the student once the student gives the pass notification to the Registrar’s Office. Obviously, an “I” in Legal Ethics is not a satisfactory completion of the course.

 

Once a student completes the actual course in Legal Ethics, s/he will have until the end of the next semester that the course is offered to deliver to the Registrar’s Office a copy of a pass notification (currently, the following Spring semester). This allows the student to participate in three (3) MPRE administrations after completing Legal Ethics to achieve a final letter grade in the course. It also means that students who take the MPRE prior to completing Legal Ethics would have more than three (3) attempts at passing the MPRE.

 

If the student does not deliver to the Registrar’s Office a copy of the pass notification by the end of the next semester that Legal Ethics is offered (currently, the following Spring semester), her or his grade will be changed from and “I” to an “F,” regardless of the grade the professor would have given the student for Legal Ethics. Students who receive an “F” in Legal Ethics will have to retake the course (provided that they otherwise have remained in good academic standing). Please take note that there are significant financial and academic consequences in receiving an “F” in any course, including but not limited to the fact a second “F” in one’s MSLAW career requires an automatic academic expulsion and that an “F” will likely cause an extension of one’s law school education.

 

Students who fail to submit a copy of an official MPRE pass notice to the Registrar’s Office by the end of the next semester that Legal Ethics is offered (currently, the following Spring semester) may submit to the Admissions Committee a petition requesting: (1) a leave of absence to allow them time to focus on the MPRE (which must be passed in order to qualify to sit for the bar exam in Massachusetts); and (2) that their “I” grade be extended for up to a year without the imposition of an “F.” Such a petition will not be allowed unless such students produce documentary proof that they have registered for the next two (2) MPRE administrations. Students who are forced to file such a petition may not take any further classes until they have passed the MPRE. Additionally, if a summer session begins after such students have finished Legal Ethics but before such students provide an MPRE pass notification to the Registrar, such students will not be permitted to recommence taking classes unless they attend at least 80% of the workshops given in the Legal Ethics Boot Camp offered by Professors Colby-Clements and Olson during the summer sessions.

 

Massachusetts School of Law's Mission

military logoMassachusetts School of Law's mission is to provide an academically rigorous affordable legal education emphasizing ethics, advocacy, leadership, and professional skills. MSLAW provides an accessible and affordable legal education to tomorrow’s leaders in law, business, and technology who seek to contribute to their communities as advocates, lawyers, and leaders. Lawyers have substantial influence in our society and MSLAW prepares its graduates to use that power to help their clients and obtain the societal advancement that a law degree has traditionally provided.

To accomplish its mission, Massachusetts School of Law brings together a diverse group of scholars, judges, expert practitioners and other professionals to provide individuals from all backgrounds a rigorous, professionally advantageous, affordable legal education so that they can improve their lives and better serve their communities.

The Massachusetts School of Law does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, disability, source of income, or status as a Vietnam-era or disabled veteran admission to, access to, treatment in, or employment in its programs and activities.
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Massachusetts School of Law's Mission

military logoMassachusetts School of Law's mission is to provide an academically rigorous affordable legal education emphasizing ethics, advocacy, leadership, and professional skills. MSLAW provides an accessible and affordable legal education to tomorrow’s leaders in law, business, and technology who seek to contribute to their communities as advocates, lawyers, and leaders. Lawyers have substantial influence in our society and MSLAW prepares its graduates to use that power to help their clients and obtain the societal advancement that a law degree has traditionally provided.

To accomplish its mission, Massachusetts School of Law brings together a diverse group of scholars, judges, expert practitioners and other professionals to provide individuals from all backgrounds a rigorous, professionally advantageous, affordable legal education so that they can improve their lives and better serve their communities.

The Massachusetts School of Law does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, disability, source of income, or status as a Vietnam-era or disabled veteran admission to, access to, treatment in, or employment in its programs and activities.